Nouns by Marty O’Connor

Curator’s Statement

Martin O’Connor paints as the masters did 100 years ago.  He adheres to his belief system that this way of making art has more depth than the superficial contemporary stuff being made today!  Well, his beliefs do hold some water.  Anyone can look at vintage classic cars, architecture and detailed carvings and elements on older buildings, clothing, furniture, sculpture and paintings to see that contemporary creations don’t have quite the charm as their predecessors.  Artists of the past often concentrated on making something simply beautiful with their hands, rather than coming up with a new gimmick or “ism”.

With his tenacity, Marty has accomplished this.  His sense and choices of light are dramatic and create sophisticated and stunning compositions.  He creates strong moods and depth in his lifelike portraits, still lifes and landscapes that compel the viewer to enjoy this age-old art medium: oil paint on canvas.

Marty, however does have a contemporary side which lies in the fact that through his subject choices, he has created edgy compositions out of issues, objects, landscapes and people of today.  He does this in the new millennium with paint, color and compositional skills of the great masters of our past!

Artist Statement

Nouns
Martin O’Connor (1972, Cleveland, Ohio) makes paintings and drawings.  He sees observational work as the “punk rock” of the art world, far removed from the academic, anti-skill conceptualism that is almost exclusive in contemporary art.  Through a radically singular approach that is nevertheless inscribed in the contemporary debate, O’Connor uses references and ideas that are so integrated into the process of the composition of the work that they may escape those who do not take the time to explore how and why these images haunt them, like a good film, long after viewers see them.  His paintings are notable for their consummate finish and tactile nature.  This is of great importance and bears witness to great craftsmanship.  By focusing on techniques and materials, he considers making art a craft which is executed using clear formal rules and which should always refer to social reality.

Bim

Bim

oil on canvas

18″ x 14″

Bishop

The Bishop

oil on canvas

16″ x 16″

Black Hat

Black Hat

oil on canvas

16″ x 12″

Colt

Colt 32

oil on canvas

11″ x 14″

Cullen

Cullen

oil on canvas

16″ x 12″

Lost BrotherTryptic

My Lost Brother

oil on linen

12″ x 9″ ea. (tryptic)

Morsels

Morsell’s

oil on canvas

24″ x 36″

Noelle

Noelle

oil on linen

14″ x 11″

Philos

The Philosopher

oil on canvas

16″ x 12″

$1800.

Solace

Solace

oil on canvas

36″ x 24″

Special

Special

oil on canvas

24″ x 48″

Advertisements